Contributor essay
by
Viktoria Tkaczyk
The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science’s database “Sound & Science: Digital Histories” is an initiative of the Research Group “Epistemes of Modern Acoustics.” This resource provides access to sources in the history of acoustics, including a multimedia archive of primary source material, documentation of surviving technology, and historical reenactments of experiments in acoustics.
Contributor essay
by
Susanne Bauer, Nils Güttler and Martina Schlünder

At Frankfurt Airport a large gray concrete wall dominates the area near the gate to the airport’s cargo facilities (Fig. 1). Cars, logistics vans, and employees arriving by bus pass through this gate on their way to the logistics buildings and apron.

Contributor essay
by
Sophia Gräfe and Alexandra Hui

In 1948, Günter Tembrock (1918–2011) established the Forschungsstätte für Tierpsychologie (Research Centre for Animal Psychology), which would become an important nexus for behavioral biology in the GDR.

Contributor essay
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Marie-Madeleine Mervant-Roux

From mid-September to mid-October 1942, Pierre Schaeffer (32) and theater director Jacques Copeau (63) co-directed a training course in Beaune (Burgundy, France): young actors were trained to use the microphone so that they might contribute to the emerging field of radiophonic arts.

Contributor essay
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Xiaochang Li

The AT&T Archives and History Center contains a sprawling collection of material from the company’s corporate and research activities extending back to the

Contributor essay
by
Christina Dörfling

When the musician Oskar Sala, co-developer and only player of the electronic instrument Trautonium, died on February 26, 2002, aged ninety-one, he had long since settled his legacy.

Contributor essay
by
Roland Wittje, Indian Institute of Technology Madras

In the 1920s, electrical companies in Europe and North America started to develop large sound amplification systems for a variety of public spaces, such as public squares, town halls, theaters, cinemas, sports arenas, and churches.

Contributor essay
by
David Pantalony; Erich Weidenhammer; Victoria Fisher

The University of Toronto acoustics collection consists of a comprehensive series of instruments made in the Parisian workshop of Rudolph Koenig (1832