For Science, Broadcasting, and Conservation JOERI BRUYNINCKX

After World War II, wildlife recordists and bioacousticians took advantage of advances in electronics and acoustics to collect, store, and analyze recordings of animal vocalizations, leading to the establishment and expansion of numerous wildlife sound archives worldwide. This article traces the technological, organizational, and social arrangements that transformed a private collection of recordings by wildlife recordist Ludwig Koch in the 1930s into one of the largest sound archives of its kind. It argues that this sound archive was consolidated through the collective efforts of a recording community—an unlikely alliance of academic biologists, commercial and amateur hobby recordists, and the public service broadcaster British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), each with a stake in the development, use, and popularization of wildlife recordings. Zooming in on the integration of British naturalists with the BBC, the article shows how, despite scientists’ oft-noted suspicion of the media, these parties developed a mutually beneficial association.

DOI: 10.1353/tech.2019.0068

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Audio
Brand, Albert. 1934. “Songs Of Wild Birds”. New York: Thomas Nelson and Sons.
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Brand, Albert. 1936. “More Songs Of Wild Birds”. New York: Thomas Nelson and Sons.
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Koch, Ludwig. 1955. “ Songs Of British Birds No.1”. Hayes: E.M.I. Records Ltd.
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Koch, Ludwig. 1958. “Songs Of British Birds No.1”. Hayes: E.M.I. Records Ltd.
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Koch, Ludwig, and Edward Nicholson. 1937. “More Songs Of Wild Birds”. London: The Parlophone Co Ltd.
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Koch, Ludwig, and Edward Nicholson. 1937. “More Songs Of Wild Birds”. London: The Parlophone Co Ltd.
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Reich, Karl. 1913. Camden, NJ: Victor talking machine co. .
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Reich, Karl. 1913. Camden, NJ: Victor talking machine co.
Text
Heinroth, Oskar, and Ludwig Koch. 1935. Gefiederte Meistersänger. Das Erste Tönende Lehr- Und Hilfsbuch Zur Beobachtung Und Bestimmung Der Heimischen Vogelwelt. Berlin: Hugo Bermühler.
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In document content:

Two grammophone records accompanying the publication E.M. Nicholson and Ludwig Koch: Songs of wild birds. Introduction by Julian S. Huxley. London, H.F. & G. Witherby, 1936 (Link to the 7th edition, 1948).

Disc 1, Side A (E.7771)

  1. Nightingale
  2. Cuckoo

Disc 1, Side B (E.7772)

  1. Blackbird
  2. Throstle
  3. (a) Pied Woodpecker (Drum)
    (b) Green Woodpecker

Disc 2, Side A (E.7774)

  1. Robin
  2. Wren
  3. Dunnock
  4. Turtledove
  5. Woodpigeon

Disc 2, Side B (E.7773)

  1. Chaffinch
  2. Willow-Warbler
  3. Whitethroat
  4. Great Tit

Picture: Front cover of Songs of Wild Birds (1936) by E.M. Nicholson and Ludwig Koch.